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When looking for interesting, unique places to see in Cincinnati…look up.

I took this advice from a family friend and discovered some of the most beautiful architecture, murals and sights Cincinnati has to offer. Look up, look behind, look around, but most importantly just look. This city has color and life around every corner just waiting to be discovered. Enjoy the view.

City Hall 

Local architect Samuel Hannaford designed City Hall in Romanesque Style with massive stones, rounded arches and a large tower, but it’s the stained glass windows that are the main wow factor.

Hathaway’s Diner 

From the black and white tiled floor to the tenured waitresses to the seafoam green seats at the counter, this classic diner has been a mainstay inside  Carew Tower since the 1950s.

The Courtyard At Iris Café 

One spectacular feature is a driftwood arbor created by Chris Daniel of Thin Air Studios, which encompasses a small seating area.

Liberty Hill Park 

Located on Boal Street. A narrow brick pathway leads through a garden of beautiful pink rose bushes and a tiny rolling hill. Encompassed by an iron gate, this perfectly maintained park includes an added feature: a complete skyline view.

Dixie Terminal 

From the arched entryway made of Rookwood tiles to the extremely long lobby made entirely of marble and glass, this structure is definitely a masterpiece of detail.

Photo by Cameron Knight

Mary Baskett’s Mt. Adams house began with a bargain:

She would only return to Cincinnati from New York if she could have “that hilltop house where I saw those marvelous views of the Ohio River.”  

Since 1977, the art dealer and former curator of prints at the Cincinnati Art Museum and husband Bill Baskett, an attorney with Frost Brown Todd, have made their home—through three renovations and counting (a pending fourth with architect José García adds a visiting artist’s suite off the first floor gallery)—the perfect convergence of things and people east and west. The champion of regional and Asian art, collector and wearer of Japanese high fashion and Cincinnati’s doyenne of arts and design asks, “Why would I live anywhere else when I can see the bend in the river?”


Built in the 1840s by stonemason John Louden—the house was originally stone and later stuccoed—the residence is one of the few in Mt. Adams to pre-date the Civil War. The massive stone wall guided the design of the pool and surrounding terraces by landscape architect John Bentley

The kitchen features original stone walls and beams that once supported an attic.  The Basketts added the fireplace in the 1977 renovation by architect Bruce Goetzman. The greenhouse was added in 2001. “That’s what you do when you live in houses,” says Baskett. “You’re always changing them.”  

The pine floors throughout the house are original. The baseboards and trim are painted what Baskett calls “Shaker Meeting House Blue.” Notes Baskett, “The house became nobler when we painted the woodwork this subtle indeterminate color we never tire of.” 

Baskett found the 19th century Korean money chest in Japan. The installation piece is by Thai sculptor and Art Academy of Cincinnati graduate Toi Ungkavatanapong. The cushions on the chairs are Thai silk.

Photos by Jesse Fox

A few tricks to turn this summer’s photos into wall-worthy works of art.

MATERIALS

  • 1 package of colored photo gels (photography shops and art supply stores carry these transparent, colored sheets)
  • 1 clear sheet of vinyl (print shops use these for document and portfolio covers, but check an art supply store because you might be able to pick up both the vinyl and photo gels there)
  • Scissors
  • Petroleum jelly (petroleum based lip gloss will work too)
  • Your camera, be it digital, film, fancy or disposable

MAKING THE CUSTOM FILTERS

Cut the colored gels and clear vinyl into small rectangles with scissors. The rectangles should be large enough hold comfortably and cover your entire camera lens, but small enough to fit in your camera case. Cut one rectangle from each of the colored photo gels and multiple rectangles from the sheet of clear vinyl. Voilà! That’s the dirty work. Now the fun begins.

USING THE COLORED PHOTO GELS 

Hold a colored gel in front of the camera lens while you take a picture to alter the mood of the photo. Try all of the colors on the same image (if you’re using a digital camera) to become familiar with the effect of each color.

USING CLEAR VINYL AND PETROLEUM JELLY

: Spread a very thin layer of petroleum jelly on the vinyl rectangle. Because this effect requires such a small amount of petroleum jelly to work, it may take a few test photos until you figure out when the jelly has been spread thin enough. Try dabbing the jelly versus spreading it horizontally or vertically. There’s no wrong method of spreading. Each way can create a unique effect.

STEP 2: Hold the rectangle in front of your camera lens when taking a photo.

STEP 3: Try petroleum jelly on the colored photo gels as well!

LIGHTENING PHOTOS

Produce a soft, mellow, more abstract image by lightening your photo. You can lighten your images by printing them at a lower saturation. This removes pigment from the photo and lessens the contrast. 

STEP 1: Adjust your printer settings or head to the local camera print shop and speak with a technician about achieving your desired effect. 

STEP 2: You can either print from a file or use a color copier. On a color copier, the setting you want is frequently called the “Density.” Shift this to be lighter. If you can, do a test print at roughly 60 percent saturation. Though printers and copiers may vary, printing at 60 percent (40 percent less than normal) saturation typically creates an ideal effect for abstraction.

CROPPING

Take artistic license and crop your photos into a square! Square images evoke memories of Polaroids and other old-timey camera formats. Common square frames are shadow boxes or record frames and will act the same as a standard frame. 

Photos by Kristina Gerig

Radio City, released in 1974, was Big Star’s second release and widely acknowledged to be their best.

Comparisons to The Beatles, The Kinks and all other things “British Invasion” are inevitable, but Radio Cityis distinctly an American take on these influences. An album full of heavy guitars and Alex Chilton’s high vocals and angry lyrics, Radio Citywas an escape from the comparisons the band had met in past and an entree into the posthumously influential album it is today.

Not a song about falling in love: “Life Is White” 

Cover photo by William Eggleston

Secret Natural Mineral promises the protection you expect from Secret with naturally derived neutralizers to zap body odor the way nature intended…with minerals.

Hannah: 21 Scent: Eucalyptus Blossom

After some grueling workouts my oxters (armpits) were still drenched but I smelled…blossomy. The scent is clean but not overpowering. However, for being marketed as “natural” product, the ingredients list still reads as gibberish. And I wouldn’t count on its promise to reduce underarm wetness. I also noticed a few stray white flakes lingering in my pits hours after drying up.


Christina: 25 Scent: Lemongrass Mint

I already use Secret, so trying Secret’s Natural Mineral deodorant wasn’t a big jump. At first it smelled like fruity tanning lotion, but that quickly went away. I don’t generally sweat much and I didn’t notice any change from the original Secret in its ability to keep me dry and smelling normal/not bad. Reading the ingredients gave me no sense of being green though—mostly chemicals.


Brittany: 25 Scent: Eucalyptus Blossom

The deodorant’s texture is smooth, not slimy and wet like other “invisible” deodorants, and it goes on clear for the most part. The smell is awesome and really sticks with you, but it’s pretty mediocre on wetness protection. I’d say it’s more effective than fully natural deodorants but not as good as the 100 percent chemical ones. I’d get a stronger chemical deodorant if I needed serious protection, but most likely continue using my natural brand because I don’t actually sweat much and don’t want the added stress of applying aluminum chemicals and such.

Lana Wright didn’t have the most popular lunchbox as a kid.

Nobody wanted to trade for her Jordanian mother’s stuffed grape leaves or za’atar-speckled breads: “They’d be grossed out and ask, ‘What is that? It looks like bird seed.’” But she’s smiling about it now. 

Food runs in her blood; she grew up watching her mother cook meals by hand. After bouncing from Cincinnati to Chicago and back—holding every restaurant position in between—she’s now General Manager at Senate in the Gateway Quarter. Amidst a hodgepodge of gourmet hot dogs with cheeky names like “Hello Kitty” and “Trailer Park,” there’s a hint of her Mediterranean influence on the menu. Named by her husband and head chef at Senate, Dan Wright, the “My Wife’s Salad” features fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil—staples in Mediterranean cuisine. 

Abigail Street, the couple’s latest venture, will be a Mediterranean wine bar (to be conjoined with Senate on Vine Street) and is set to open in July or August. The menu will pay homage to Lana’s love for her culture and all things fresh and simple. Don’t expect shish kabob combos or soggy falafel sandwiches; instead, think grilled octopus. 

Hot dogs have a place in Lana’s heart, but Abigail Street is a necessary alternative for herself and fellow beef ’n beer loving ladies. “I’ve gained 10 or 15 pounds in the last year,” she chuckles. “Like many women, I can’t eat here every day.”

So she’s taking it back to basics: “It’s just food. Be simple. Be fun. Food shouldn’t be taken so seriously.”

According to Dan, Lana’s husband, Fattoush has potential to be “My Wife’s Other Salad.” Lana loves to serve this simple salad at summer get-togethers: “It’s just colorful and fresh and everyone will think you spent forever making it.”


FATTOUSH: LEBANESE BREAD SALAD

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 English cucumber
  • 2 yellow bell peppers
  • 3 medium tomatoes
  • 2 bunches of green onions
  • 3 lemons
  • 4 oz. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. of za’atar (available at Findlay Market inside Dean’s Mediterranean Imports) 
  • 2 pieces of pocket pita
  • Salt and pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS

: Preheat oven to 350º F. Cut pita in half. Lay pita out on a baking sheet and drizzle with 2 oz. of olive oil. Sprinkle za’atar over oiled pita and bake for seven minutes or until golden brown.

: Rinse veggies. Chop the tomatoes into a large dice (½-inch pieces) and add to a large bowl. Cut English cucumbers into a large dice and add to the bowl of tomatoes. Cut bell peppers in half; discard stem and seeds. Chop bell peppers into ½-inch pieces and add to bowl. Chop green onions. Add to bowl. All vegetables can be cut in advance but should be mixed together right before serving.

: Remove pita from oven. 

: Slice lemons in half and add juice to chopped vegetables. Drizzle vegetables with remaining olive oil. Crumble za’atar bread into chopped vegetables, mix all ingredients and season with salt and pepper to taste.

Photos by Emily Maxwell

It’s a balmy summer evening. A stunning woman walks into the room.

You admire her gorgeous hair (and wonder how she gets it to defy this humidity) and her luminous skin (a healthy glow, not overly tanned). Her wardrobe is flawless—a fabulous dress and a pair of sandals that give you shoe envy. As you’re admiring her sandals, you notice that while her toenails are painted her heels are thickly calloused and cracked…

Summer is a great time of year. We bare more skin and enjoy the warmth of the sun, but we can’t forget our poor feet. You don’t have to spend a fortune or a lot of time on a pedicure. Here are some suggestions:

Ambiance Nail Salon & Spa (my personal favorite) on Madison Road in Hyde Park has a wide range of pedicures to help keep your feet up to par. The salon is reasonable, highly efficient and delivers excellent service. Plus they must have at least 20 pedicure chairs.

If you’re looking for a more indulgent, private experience, check out The Woodhouse Spa in Montgomery. While you’re enjoying your luxurious surroundings, think about adding a 20-minute reflexology treatment to your pedi.

And if you can’t manage to get in for a pedicure, pick up some Flexitol Heel Balm (available at most drugstores for around $10). After you pumice your feet in the shower, apply some Flexitol before bed for a few evenings. Your cracked feet will look like new.

Summer is hot. The last thing you want to put on before you walk out the door is a full face of heavy makeup (and/or a wool coat).

Use these techniques to get a flawless, natural look with the coverage you want. This way you can play up your facial assets at a pool party or barbecue without looking like a character from Dynasty or sweating mascara into your eyeballs.


STEP 1: Using a synthetic brush, apply a bronze colored cream base to the eyelid, up to brow crease. Blend upward with finger to eyebrow.

STEP 2: Pat a dark brown cream shadow into eyelid crease using a brush or your finger. Blend outward.

STEP 3: Apply a brown liquid liner along lashline using the provided wand or an angled brush.

STEP 4: Apply a liquid highlight under the brow starting under the highest point of the of the eyebrow arch and working your way down and out.

STEP 5: Take a soft bristle brush and pat a bronzer on top of the cream shadow in your eyelid crease.

STEP 6: Apply black or brown waterproof mascara. Add to bottom lashline.

STEP 7: Take concealer and apply only where you need it. Use a brush and fingers to blend. 

STEP 8: Follow concealer with a tinted moisturizer to even out skintone.

STEP 9: Set makeup with translucent powder.

STEP 10:  Enhance and contour cheekbones by using a big bristle brush and a light application of bronzer. Blend upward. Continue applying to any area of the face where you would naturally get sun.

STEP 11: Apply a natural pink blush with a larger brush to the apple of the cheeks. 

STEP 12: Finish the look with a clear lip gloss. To add definition, apply a light pink or brown lip liner to the prominent curves in the lip and blend. Follow with gloss.

Tips

  • If you don’t have the appropriate makeup brush, use your fingers
  • Create a softer look with brown liquid eyeliner
  • Use a tinted moisturizer for coverage and natural shine without the heavy look of foundation
  • Apply a light wash of bronzer to your neck, décolleté and your shoulders
  • For more of a flushed look, apply blush farther down your cheek
    and farther back toward your hairline
  • Create your own tinted moisturizer or lighten the color of your current tinted moisturizer by adding additional moisturizer to the product on the back of your hand before application

Gin. Some of you might love it and others won’t touch the stuff!

For those of you who have sworn off this light, refreshing ancient spirit, I’m here to enlighten you. Hopefully you’ll be willing to give it another go. 

Gin is a neutral spirit whose predominate flavor is derived from juniper berries. Gin was first made as an elixir in the 1300s to help ward off the Bubonic Plague; it worked mainly because juniper is a natural flea repellent.

The Dutch started making “genever” in the 16th century (“genever” means juniper in Dutch). The Dutch then introduced it to the English during the Thirty Years’ War, and the English called it “gin.” The Dutch and English brought gin to America, where it was popular until the 1960s, in particular during Prohibition because it was easy to make in a bathtub.

There are different styles of gin. “London Dry” is the most common and the most juniper-forward. “Plymouth Gin” is still made in the English Channel port of Plymouth. “Old Tom Gin” is lightly sweetened. 

“Compound Gin” aka “Bathtub Gin” is made by flavoring a neutral grain spirit with juniper and botanical essences. Most small batch gins, such as Hendrick’s Gin, are classified as “Distilled.” 

In this drink I’ve made a cardamom simple syrup to bring out the botanical flavors. I call it a “Noggin Cleanser” because cardamom is supposed to help clear the mind.


NOGGIN CLEANSER

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ oz. Hendrick’s Gin
  • ½ of a lime
  • ¾ oz. cardamom syrup
  • 3 oz. soda water
  • Ice
  • Lime wedge for garnish
  • Cardamom syrup (1 cup serving)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 20 green cardamom pods, crushed

NOGGIN CLEANSER

: In a mixing glass add gin, lime and cardamom syrup. 

: Add ice and shake, shake, shake! 

: Strain into a highball glass filled with ice and top off with soda. 

Gin. Some of you might love it and others won’t touch the stuff!

For those of you who have sworn off this light, refreshing ancient spirit, I’m here to enlighten you. Hopefully you’ll be willing to give it another go. 

Gin is a neutral spirit whose predominate flavor is derived from juniper berries. Gin was first made as an elixir in the 1300s to help ward off the Bubonic Plague; it worked mainly because juniper is a natural flea repellent.

The Dutch started making “genever” in the 16th century (“genever” means juniper in Dutch). The Dutch then introduced it to the English during the Thirty Years’ War, and the English called it “gin.” The Dutch and English brought gin to America, where it was popular until the 1960s, in particular during Prohibition because it was easy to make in a bathtub.

There are different styles of gin. “London Dry” is the most common and the most juniper-forward. “Plymouth Gin” is still made in the English Channel port of Plymouth. “Old Tom Gin” is lightly sweetened. 

“Compound Gin” aka “Bathtub Gin” is made by flavoring a neutral grain spirit with juniper and botanical essences. Most small batch gins, such as Hendrick’s Gin, are classified as “Distilled.” 

In this drink I’ve made a cardamom simple syrup to bring out the botanical flavors. I call it a “Noggin Cleanser” because cardamom is supposed to help clear the mind.


NOGGIN CLEANSER

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ½ oz. Hendrick’s Gin
  • ½ of a lime
  • ¾ oz. cardamom syrup
  • 3 oz. soda water
  • Ice
  • Lime wedge for garnish
  • Cardamom syrup (1 cup serving)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 20 green cardamom pods, crushed

NOGGIN CLEANSER

STEP 1: In a mixing glass add gin, lime and cardamom syrup. 

STEP 2: Add ice and shake, shake, shake! 

STEP 3: Strain into a highball glass filled with ice and top off with soda. 

STEP 4: Garnish with a wedge of lime. 

CARDAMOM SYRUP

STEP 1:Add all ingredients to a sauce pan and bring to a boil. 

STEP 2: Take off heat. 

STEP 3: Let cool for about 30 minutes and then strain out cardamom. 

STEP 4: Can be stored in refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Photos by Emily Maxwell

Does a tea a day keep the doctor away?

With a latte in one hand and a Coke in the other, it might be a little tough to go herbal. 

Coffee and soda might be the non-alcoholic beverages of choice in the States, but tea stands as number two only to water in the rest of the world. But the facts are in: Thirsty folks everywhere are finding big reasons to trade in their Mr. Coffees for teapots.

The convincing factor for most seems to be health. Tea is said to prevent cancer growth, lower cholesterol, improve complexion, increase metabolism and improve digestion. When Mom told you to eat your vegetables, apparently she should have been funneling you tea. 

According to Dr. Michael Nichols, a chiropractor at the alternative health provider Gateways to Healing, there are countless papers confirming and disputing the health benefits of tea without strong scientific support in either camp. Tea is not a highly funded study in the drug research community, but Nichols promotes a tea-enriched lifestyle.

“I think tea is not a miracle elixir to cure all ills, but something a person can do as a healthy substitute for other kinds of beverages,” Nichols says.

He encourages his patients who drink coffee to switch to organic, water-processed decaf or tea, but he’s not blind to the proposed downsides to drinking tea, either.

Oxalates, found in tea and vegetables, are said to cause kidney stones when taken in high doses on a daily basis. And while tea contains less caffeine than a cup of coffee, it’s still not great to consume high doses. Tea enthusiasts should also be careful where they get their decaf from—chemical processes can contaminate the leaves. Nichols advises buying organic—only to avoid chemicals and harsh pesticides.

Research does show, however, that tea is full of nutrients like polyphenols and other types of antioxidants.

The amino acid L-Theanine is also naturally occurring in tea and can promote relaxation without drowsiness and strengthen the immune system.

“It makes you more mentally aware, but also makes you sort of mellow,” John Stafford Hogan, manager of Essencha Teahouse and passionate tea drinker, says of the amino acid. 

Tea’s reemergence on the American scene became evident to Hogan when a rush of customers came in one morning, stammering as they tried to order matcha, a previously rarely tried green tea. Talk show queen Oprah turned out to be the culprit after featuring the antioxidant-rich drink on her show, and her fans flocked to teahouses to try it for themselves. 

“All teas have antioxidants,” Hogan says. “That’s one thing that’s kind of a misconception.” He notes that most customers who drink tea for health go for the green, but he stresses that all types of teas contain plenty of healthy attributes. 

“I don’t think you should drink tea just for the health benefits,” Hogan says. “You should enjoy it, too.” 

If a cup a day (or one to six, according to Dr. Nichols) might be able to keep the doctor away, why not give it a shot? If you’re interested in making the switch everyone’s been talking about for centuries, take your pick from the variety of teahouse tastes available all over the city. 


“Tea originated in China and was brought to Japan by Buddhist monks,” Kathleen Kern, owner of Churchill’s Fine Teas in Findlay Market, says. Each culture has its own brewing and preparation techniques. Here’s a compilation from our experts on the health benefits of different types of tea.

Black Tea

This strong, sometimes bitter brew is said to lower cholesterol, regulate blood sugar and promote healthy teeth and bones.

Green Tea

May boost the immune system, lower cholesterol, aid the digestive system, regulate blood sugar. Contains proposed cancer-fighting polyphenols.  

Oolong Tea

Along with its reputably delicate flavor, oolong tea can increase metabolism and improve digestion and complexion.

White Tea

This sweet, light flavor will taste even better when considering its low caffeine content, complexion enhancing qualities and the possible prevention of cancer growth. 

Rooibos

It’s not really tea, but brewed from a type of bush found in South Africa. Aside from including all the regular nutrients of the real thing, one of the coveted perks of this tea imitation is that it’s caffeine free. 

Herbal Tea

Despite the name, herbal tea is not actually a member of the tea family, either. More like a distant cousin. But there are still plenty of antioxidants to go around.